ICESat-2 - Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite

ICESat-2 - Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite

ICESat-2 Mission Phases

ICESat-2 Mission Phases

01/01/2000 to 05/04/2014

ATLAS Instrument and Spacecraft Development

05/01/2014 to 07/04/2016

Integration and Testing

10/01/2016 to 11/01/2016

Pre-Launch

11/01/2017 to 11/30/2017

Launch

12/01/2017 to 02/01/2018

Check-Out

02/02/2018 to 02/01/2021

Orbit and data collection

Laser Focus

Related News

Related News

Kelly Brunt - Commuting to the World's Coldest Job

Studying the cryosphere sometimes requires glaciologist Kelly Brunt to get out of the lab and onto icy terrain.

 

How NASA measures the death of a glacier from space

Only 25 glaciers remain inside Glacier National Park — down from 150 in the mid-19th century — and scientists estimate that these peaceful giants that sculpt the homes of grizzly bears and wildflowers will be gone by 2050.

John Sonntag - Weather Nerd, Computer Geek, Cryospheric Scientist

John Sonntag says every element of his job as a cryosphere scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, excites him.  

Space Lasers

Space Lasers

ICESat-2's laser is split into six beams, to better measure Earth's surface.  Find out more here.

Multimedia

ICESat-2, illustrated

ICESat-2 will use six laser beams to measure the height of ice, as illustrated in this not-to-scale artist's rendering. This illustration is an outcome of the ICESat-2/SCAD Collaborative Student Project.

Launch Card

Launch in FY
2018

Feature Articles

Feature Articles

Did you know?

Did you know?

This satellite really moves

ICESat-2 flies at 4.3 miles per second, relative to the ground. That's longer than 70 football fields, put end-to-end, in one second.

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